New and Recent Books

Marber's first book, From Third World to World Class: The Future of Emerging Markets in the Global Economy, was named a top ten business book in 1998 by the Knight Ridder newspapers and was called "future reference reading for The 24/7 Global Marketplace" by Wired magazine in 2001. His second book, Money Changes Everything: How Global Prosperity is Reshaping Our Needs, Values, and Lifestyles, was published by Financial Time Prentice Hall in 2003. David Brooks of the New York Times has noted, "Money Changes Everything is an outstanding primer on the awesome social effects of globalization." His third book, Seeing the Elephant: Understanding Globalization from Trunk to Tail, was published by John Wiley in 2009. In 2013 he co-edited Higher Education in the Global Age: Policy, Practice, and Promise in Emerging Societies with Daniel Araya for Routledge. Based on his thought-provoking 2012 article for the World Policy Journal, Marber attacks conventional wisdom and recommends new metrics and policies to promote broader prosperity in the 21st century in his most recent book, Brave New Math:  Information, Globalization, and New Economic Thinking in the 21st Century.

 
  Brave New Math: Information, Globalization, and New Economic Thinking in the 21st Century

 

Brave New Math:
Information, Globalization, and New Economic Thinking in the 21st Century

Brave New Math

Amid globalization, traditional economic measures like Gross Domestic Product, unemployment, and stock markets leave us with a distorted worldview - and a shaky foundation for policy decisions. In the Information Age, aren't there better indicators to manage our country's well-being? In Brave New Math, Peter Marber attacks conventional wisdom and recommends new metrics and policies to promote broader prosperity in the 21st century.

 
  Higher Education in the Global Age: Policy, Practice and Promise in Emerging Societies

 

Higher Education in the Global Age:
Policy, Practice and Promise in Emerging Societies

Higher Education in the Global Age

Discussions on globalization now routinely focus on the economic impact of developing countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, the former Soviet Union and Latin America. Given current trajectories, most economists predict that China and India alone will account for half of global output by 2050 (almost a complete return to their positions prior to the Industrial Revolution). How is higher education shaping and being shaped by these massive tectonic shifts? As education rises as a geopolitical priority, it has converged with discussions on economic policy and a global labor market.